10 Parenting Quotes from Books You Should Read

There’s a million parenting books on the market. Actually, according to Amazon, there are over 228,000 parenting books. But I’m pretty sure a lot of them say the same thing, and most of them are probably at best cliche, and at worst, garbage.

Obviously, I haven’t read all of them, but I’d like to quote from 9 of my favorite parenting books. There were so many good ones in these few books, that I couldn’t move on to a 10th book or beyond. Maybe next year! By that time, though, I’ll need to review these quotes again.

If you like these, write these nuggets of truth down on 3×5 cards and plaster them around the house, preferably in all the places where you get frustrated at your kids. Perhaps over the kitchen sink or on their bedroom door. Better yet, by the shoe basket where no one puts shoes, the bathroom where nobody hangs up towels, or the kitchen table that nobody cleans off before dinner. Those sorts of places.

I find that when I’m reading and re-reading helpful information, it actually does start to sink in, and I parent with more grace, love, and perspective.

Alright, enough suspense. Here they are (but feel free to add yours in the comments section):

from Age of Accountability by Paul David Tripp

 

 

from Shepherding a Child’s Heart by Tedd Tripp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mothering Alone

Below is a slightly-reworked blog I wrote for Lift Up Your Day, which appeared for Mother’s Day on May 10, 2016. I thought you might enjoy it if you are a mom who parents alone, either literally or figuratively.

Your husband might work all the time, be on the road, or serve overseas. You might be separated or divorced, so paternal help (or lack of it) brings emotionally-charged interaction. You might be widowed, with no help, plus the grief that your husband is missing out on everything, and your kids are missing out on him.

If you’re a single mother, you hold unique perspectives about parenting, and you frankly get annoyed with all the dual-parenting advice that comes your way from the church community.

You wish the church would just talk about the differences between married and unmarried parenting. So this is for you–

Mothering Alone

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Why Mother’s Day hurts

Grief has been making herself a general nuisance in my life this week. She’s preparing for Mother’s Day.

Yesterday, I picked up a bronze memorial plaque at the trophy store bearing my mom’s name; it will adorn a bench on a deck that leans over a duck pond–the pond where, every time Mom visited us, we took my little boys on a walk with a bag of bread crumbs.

Before I picked up the plaque, I had prepared myself for feelings nostalgia, reverence, sadness. I didn’t prepare for anger. I’m not angry about Mother’s Day. (Well, sometimes I have been. On days when no one prepared anything or they ran out that morning for a card–but that’s another story.) I wasn’t angry about the plaque. Late in the day I noticed that I felt grumpy, sullen, and irritable. And then I was tearful. For no apparent reason.

Grief opened the front door and told Anger, Come on in, and Anger came in and sat down and put her feet up. She looked over my plaque and said it was a lovely thing to do. Mom would have liked it. The place I picked out in the park is perfect. What a nice way to remember her in a town where she never lived. And then Anger whispered, It’s not fair. And I agreed. But then my my brain responded in my mother’s voice, “Life’s not fair,” which made me miss her more. Continue reading